2016 Clinical Investigator Award Recipients

Robert Canter, MD
University of California Davis School of Medicine in the Department of Surgery, Division of Surgical Oncology
Proposal: Radiation and Natural Killer Cell Immunotherapy to Target Tumor Heterogeneity in Canine Bone and Soft Tissue Sarcoma
Supported by an educational grant from Genentech, a member of the Roche Group.

Dr. Canter obtained his undergraduate degree from Princeton University and his medical degree from the University of Pennsylvania. He completed general surgery training at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania followed by subspecialty training in Surgical Oncology at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. In 2007, he joined the faculty of the University of California Davis School of Medicine in the Department of Surgery, Division of Surgical Oncology. Dr. Canter's research focuses on sarcoma cancer stem cells as a mechanism of resistance to standard anti-proliferative anti-cancer therapies, and he is studying natural killer (NK) cellular immunotherapy as a mechanism to target the cancer stem cell population following standard cancer treatments such as radiotherapy. His goal is to translate these studies to early phase clinical trials for canine and human patients with advanced bone and soft tissue sarcomas. He currently holds the title of Associate Professor.


Kelly Olino, MD
University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston
Proposal: Therapeutic Synthetic Peptide Nanofiber Vaccines Targeting Melanoma
Supported by an educational grant from Amgen, Inc.


Dr. Kelly Olino was born in Queens, New York, and earned her BS from Cornell University in Biological Sciences and her MD from the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine where she completed her residency in General Surgery. She completed a three year T32 research fellowship in tumor immunology during her residency training and was awarded the Anthony Imbembo Resident Teaching Award three times. Dr. Olino went on to complete a clinical fellowship at the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City where in collaboration with Diane Reidy, MD, she conceived of and wrote a human clinical trial using pembrolizumab for the treatment of adrenocortical carcinoma which is currently accruing patients.

Dr. Olino is currently a Provost Scholar at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston where she is an Assistant Professor of Surgery. Dr. Olino is developing the tumor immunology program and currently focusing on utilizing nanofiber technology to develop cancer vaccines directed at melanoma.